Habitually Yours

A Justine in her natural writing habitat.

When I was a kid, I had the wonderfully gross habit of chewing things. I was like a little rat. I chewed on pencils and pens until they would splinter. I would chew on bizarre things. I wouldn’t find out until way later that it was actually sensory seeking behavior—the product of a Sensory Processing Disorder I had, and have since inadvertently passed to my son (that’s the only way it even got diagnosed).

It’s a strange thing. I broke that chewing habit somehow long before I ever thought of having Logan, and yet somehow, he picked up the same habit. We’re struggling to break him from it now.

Habits, as it turns out, are strange and unpredictable things. Some are in our blood, our DNA, like my weird chewing habit. Some form accidentally, like the way you go to the store across the street for lunch, once, twice, and before you know it, we’re regulars. Some habits, the best habits, are the ones we form on purpose.

They say it takes twenty-one days for a habit to form. That kind of habit is a different brand. It starts with a commitment. You decide you’re going to create a habit and then you do it. That’s the intention of programs like NaNoWriMo. You write as much as you can for as many days in a row, and eventually you form a habit.

I used to have a fairly consistent writing habit. I wrote once a day, at least something. Lately, I have allowed that to drop. Life has been perpetually getting in the way of things, our editing business is keeping me in editing jobs (no complaints there), and I just haven’t been carving out the time to write.

That is about to change. For months, I’ve been agonizing about how to get myself started again. I have a few projects in mind, but none of them are jumping out more to me than the others. They all have their benefits, but I need to find which one is my next big project.

Last week, I received my second Scribbler box and it had a journal in it. It contained 300 Writing Prompts. It isn’t the first one I’ve had. The last time I used one it helped me get a handle on character. So, I’ve decided to restart my writing habit. As of this month, I will be writing at least a prompt a day. Each will be written in the voice of one of the characters I’ve been playing with. If I like them, I will post them here. If I don’t, it was worth the attempt.

And by the end of March, I hope to have figured out which voice I want to explore the most. Wish me luck, you guys. By April and Camp NaNoWriMo, I’m hoping to be back in the writing habit.

Scribbler!

I’ve been itching to try the Scribbler subscription box for writers since it was first released. But alas, there’s the issue of budget that never allowed me to sign up. May I take a moment to say “Yay Christmas Bonuses!” Because I get to share my very first Scribbler box with you!

So I intended to take pictures if each item, and my Logan knew it. Hence, we get pictures like this.

The first thing I spotted when I opened my Scribbler box was a near magnetized dry erase board. I used it immediately to write a love letter.

The author of the month this month was YA fantasy author Evelyn Skye, who had a short story in the Sucker Literary anthology I was promoting around here a few years ago. The book that accompanies this box is Circle of Shadows. It is her third book, an epic fantasy. The book includes a signed bookplate.

Not only is the book included, but there is also a separate pamphlet that offers an inside look at the editing process. She shows us a scene from Circle of Shadows that was cut in edits, and walks us through everything that has changed since, including a whole storyline that was cut.

Evelyn also wrote up a great collection of tips and tricks for writing fantasy—mainly focusing on building magic systems and how it figures into and impacts world building.

This sticker gives me life.

An invitation to an exclusive chat with Kristin Rens, Executive Editor at Balzer + Bray, was also included, but, as is always my luck, it lands on the day and (believe it or not) exact time of a seriously important doctor’s appointment, so I won’t be able to attend. 😦

There was a great little notebook with a sturdy cover, built for the kind of writer that writes on the go. You can work on the writing prompt they sent in that adorable little notebook.

And lastly, this warm scribbler beanie, perfect for the snowy weather I’ve been trudging through–as modeled by Logan.

So, what did I think of my first Scribbler box? I loved it! Just having a bunch of cute things that relate to my life as a writer, while also relating to my life loving YA novels is just perfect. I do wish the writing chat was something I could attend—for instance, not in the middle of a normal workday—but other than that, every single piece included is going to get a lot of use from me.

I can’t afford to do this every month, but I think there are more of these in my future.

To sign up for a Scribbler box, go here!